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Embracing Your Bio Individuality

Bio- Individuality:

Recognizes that there's no one-size-fits-all diet.

Each person is a unique individual with highly individualized

nutritional requirements, based on factors that include personal

tastes and inclinations, natural shapes and sizes, blood types,

metabolic rates and generic backgrounds.

Bio-individuality is such an crucial concept that is so important to keep top of mind.

Perfect example:

For years being dairy free and macro tracking has been my main way to monitor my food intake, nutrients and stay in shape. Tracking daily has become such a part of my life that it's as natural as brushing my teeth when I wake up. On the flip side I've worked with a TON of people who can't wrap their mind around tracking / don't thrive when tracking and actually it stresses some people out so much they GAIN weight tracking! So when the Whole 30 meal plan gained popularity and more and more people were sharing stories of a "lifestyle diet" that you can eat as much as you want of certain food groups without tracking and loosing weight I of course had to try it! Nope, not for me. I actually gained weight on it (calories in vs calories is no joke)! Not gonna lie I went through a bit of a "what's wrong with me" minute that this diet that SO many people I knew were getting in the best shape of their life on and had me gaining weight.

It all comes back to bio-individuality. What works for you may not work for me and vice-versa. And guess what - that's ok!! Seriously though, it can be so hard to wrap your mind around why some diets make some people thrive but don't work at all for you which is where the concept of bio-individuality we must keep top of mind.

There are SO many different "lifestyles" to explore that get some amazing feedback! From paleo to the raw food diet to the blood type diet. It can be super overwhelming to figure out what will take your body to it's peak.

Whatever intrigues you and you decide to experiment with keep in mind it takes your body on average two weeks to get used to a new way of eating. So for 14 days of being dairy free for example our bodies our getting rid of the traces of whatever dairy you've taken out and to literally trying to figure out how to function without the dairy it was used to. Then after those 14 days you can get a true assessment of how your body is going to handle the change. I always encourage people to give themselves a solid three weeks to try something new with an open mind and an open heart before they throw in the towel or decide this is going to work for them :)

You got this team! Trust your intuition and as always reach out if you need any help along the way.